Shapton Professional 2000

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Kit Craft
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Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:16 am

Shapton Professional (Ha no kuromaku) 2000: The one and done

Background:

As I noted in my other review, about the 1k, this stone is a replacement for my older Shapton pro stones that I picked up a long time ago for my woodworking tools. I wore them down and they broke due to thinness. I used them and used them and used them some more. I bring this up because this particular stone is sold under the JP monicker rather than the Professional stones typically marketed in the USA. I think this is due to the dispute with the Shapton USA distributor but that is another story for another time. Regardless, I have used the JP and USA stones side by side and while there may be some merit to the story about them having a different formulation for different climates, I don’t buy it. To me they are the same stone. Not that it matters because it seems that most US dealers have the JP versions in now unless they have old stock but I digress.

Measurements:

Weight: 500g
Length: 205mm
Width: 75mm
Thickness: 15mm

Feedback:

I am going to start this off by saying that this stone resonates with the type of feedback that I like most and as such I might come across more enthusiastic than with other stones and for that I appologize in advance. Point is, yes, I am partial to this stone.

Moving on, the tactile feedback of this stone is quite good, to say the least. Maybe it is not the best but then that is subjective. Regardless, it has a smooth and creamy feel to it and at the same time it has a hard chalky feel to it. That perfect merge of coarse grainy feel yet smooth, chalky and fine as well as creamy as you build some slurry.

When you put the bevel to the stone it clicks in place BUT it is not as immediate as some others such as the 1k variant. At the same time it is still very noticeable. However, once that bevel is locked in place you can feel where it is at all times. There is no “washing” in feel like you get with softer stones that conform to the bevel. If you go over your angle you will bite into the stone. You will slightly skid but come to a full stop quickly after. This stone is hard but will still gouge if enough force is applied, which is actually fairly surprising. Being a hard and medium fine stone it will make that “zizz” noise that I am always talking about if you go under your angle.

Audible feedback is nice. It is firm, low pitch and authoritative. It sounds exactly like chalk on a blackboard. Very zen like and relaxing if I do say so myself. If you go over your angle it will screech or squeal. No, not like a piggy and don’t even go there...More like a chicken if you squeeze it too hard...wait, that is no better. Anyway, if you go under your angle the pitch becomes lower and more hollow like as if tapping on a tin can.

Visual feedback is noticeable from the onset. It is a quick stone and it shows it. With cladding you get a grey puddle first and then it turns black. That is because this stone, unlike the others in the series, raises a thick colloidal slurry with the use of a wide or single bevel. You can replicate this on narrow bevels with a diamond plate but more on that later. As you remove more cladding your puddle will change to black like ink atop the stone, par for the course. On narrow bevels you get a more grainy slurry with little bits of metal and burr suspended atop the water which in turn is suspended atop the stone. The point is that you can see metal being removed from the first stroke.

Management:

Water management is easy as this stone is quite non porous. It simply does not absorb water, or at least it does so very, very slowly and very little at a time. You can leave water sit atop the stone for hours and hours and it will stay there. However, you will push water off of the stone and or it will mix with mud/slurry/swarf and become a thick goo and then you will have to add a drop or two to thin it out.

Mud management is also easy but needed on wide bevels. If you add no water your slurry and mud will thicken and become chalk like, you don’t want that. Also, if you add too much you will have no mud, which you also do not want or at least not if you want contrast on your bevel. If you clean the stone it will leave little contrast but if you let it “mud up” it will leave a decent contrast between soft cladding and hard core steel. So just a drop or two here and there so that you can keep it medium thick.

Speed:

This stone is fast for a 2k, quite fast. It will raise a burr in a few passes and as always a pass for me is about 10 single direction strokes from tip to heel and then back again. That is like 20 stropping motions. I would say two passes will raise a burr on most basic stainless and faster on carbon. You could realistically use this stone to set bevels but it would take a little longer than a 1k. Still, if you are looking for a one stone solution, this could be it.

Finesse:

Finesse on this one is interesting. It is not quite as fine as it could be at 2k but it is close to where it needs to be. It leaves a lot of bite in an edge, most of the time. Some of the finer grained carbons such as white steel feel like they are coming off of a 3k+ stone whereas some coarser grained stainless feels like it is coming off of a 1500.

Testing the edge allows you to do hands free tomato cutting, drop tests etc. It shaves arm hair without any discomfort yet tugs on paper towel, showing that it has some bite left. Don’t mistake that, it is still a clean and fairly keen edge. A very good edge for all round work on a board and in hand.

The cosmetic finish left by this is matte and becoming shiny on a narrow bevel. On a clad wide bevel it leaves a medium dark finish on the cladding with very light scratches and a slightly shiny core steel. Not a perfect Kasmui but a very good working Kasumi and the texture of the cladding is fine enough that you do not see much resistance. Not something I expected from such a stone so it is a pleasant surprise. I had it for years before finding this hidden tallent.

Hardness:

This is a weird stone in terms of hardness. It feels dense yet hollow at the same time. It kind of reminds me of a resinoid stone in that it has that pencil eraser feel yet harder and with better feedback. The stone is hard but has an elastic feel to it. It is dense yet not too dense and you can see this if you weigh the stone. It weighs in a good 50 grams lighter than its 1k sibling yet is the same size in every other way. It is a pleasant to use hardness and I wish the rest of the line was like this.

This one should be fine for those who are comfortable with soft or hard stones. I don’t think either preference will be hindered much one way or the other.

Dishing:

This stone will dish but much slower than the 1k. You can go a few sessions, even with wide bevel knives, before needing to flatten and it will not be too far out of whack. However, do not let it get ahead of you as these stones are not fun to flatten if you let them valley.

Vanity:

It is a pretty aqua colored stone with little black flecks here and there.

Value:

This stone is a tremendous value in that it can be used as both a Medium and Medium fine stone. Also, it is fairly low cost or at least of equal valume at $60 when compared to other stones in its range of 1500-3000 grit.

Bottom line:

This is probably my favorite synthetic stone. No, not for its grit rating, period. It has good to great feedback, leaves a great cosmetic finish, leaves a great working edge with some bite, is fast enough to set a bevel and fine enough to finish if you are none too picky anyway. Add to that its price and the fact that it is truly splash and go and you have a winner. I am on my second one and will never be without one. In fact, it is probably my “island stone”.

So just who is this stone for? Well, for those who like an edge that is slightly refined yet has a fair amount of bite. That is to say if you want to use it as a finisher. In that case it makes for a great all round edge and one that is nice for butchery too. If you like fairly hard stones that are splash and go, it has that going for it. It even has its own case/stone holder. Feedback is nice and it cuts quickly too. So if you like a fast stone that feels good and one that leaves nice contrast, this is your stone. It works as a stepping stone too.

You might not like this stone if you like softer stones that are uber muddy and require a soak. Also, if you are looking for something as a stepping stone to a 10-12-16k stone and want a really, really refined edge you might prefer something finer but then you likely wouldn’t be looking at a 2k stone to begin with. Also, if you need a stone that removes less metal and is more about polishing, maybe this is not your stone either. In fact, if you prefer stones like the green brick of joy then you might just hate this stone.

Again, a good stone at a good price. It may or may not be for you but that is for you to decide.

Notes:

As always I forgot to put things like what steels this stone was tested with so I will do it now. I have used this stone and the one before it for a long time with many types of steels on many things ranging from tools, to razors to knives. So simple 10xx steel, Japanese carbon, Swedish stainless and PM and tool steels. Nothing seems to make it flinch however the glass 2k cuts super alloyed steel faster. It does not react the same as the pro nor give the same finish though. Which you need is up to you but if you own mostly PM steel I would go with glass. If you own mostly basic carbon and simple stainless then I suggest the pro.

I am also going to go back to doing a separate post for the photos as I don't like the way they break up the review. Feel free to tell me if you prefer it one way or the other.

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:22 am

This photo was taken after a single pass on one side so you can see how quickly it cuts and kicks up slurry.

Image

I took this after a few passes on each side of the "wide bevel" and as you can see it is starting to get muddy. The mud is also starting to thicken rather than the look you get from slurry and swarf suspended in water.

Image

I believe I actually took this photo before the last but it should still give you an idea of the consistency of the mud.

Image

Here we get a basic idea of what the finish will look like. As always, I did a quick and easy finish. If you spend more time, like you would on a nicer blade, you will get a more even finish. :P Regardless it shows that it leaves decent contrast and that is fairly dark on the cladding.

Image

This one is just at a different angle to give you an idea of contrast and I like that the water is still sitting on it...I am simple.

Image

Kalaeb
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kalaeb » Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:19 pm

Great write up and a awesome stone.

nevrknow
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by nevrknow » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:43 pm

I got one of these a while back in a bulk buy from a brother. Have not used it yet.
Your timing could not have been better for a review. Traveling again this week and threw it in my bag for fun.

I will use it tonight and compare with your thoughts.

Thanks again for a great write-up Kit!

nevrknow
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by nevrknow » Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:44 pm

I got one of these a while back in a bulk buy from a brother. Have not used it yet.
Your timing could not have been better for a review. Traveling again this week and threw it in my bag for fun.

I will use it tonight and compare with your thoughts.

Thanks again for a great write-up Kit!

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Mon Dec 11, 2017 4:28 pm

Kalaeb wrote:
Mon Dec 11, 2017 12:19 pm
Great write up and a awesome stone.
Thank you, and I agree that it is an awesome stone! :D

salemj
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by salemj » Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:55 pm

Love it, as always. I want this stone!
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Tue Dec 12, 2017 8:32 am

nevrknow wrote:
Mon Dec 11, 2017 3:43 pm
I got one of these a while back in a bulk buy from a brother. Have not used it yet.
Your timing could not have been better for a review. Traveling again this week and threw it in my bag for fun.

I will use it tonight and compare with your thoughts.

Thanks again for a great write-up Kit!
No problem, I rather enjoy giving my thoughts about sharpening stones. I don't think I have ever had a hobby that I "clicked" this well with so I do what I can to expand on that.

I would love to hear your thoughts on this stone as well! I am sure if two people use the stone differently their results will differ at least slightly. Learning from one another is always great. So let us know what you think!

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:38 am

salemj wrote:
Mon Dec 11, 2017 11:55 pm
Love it, as always. I want this stone!
Thank you kindly. Good to hear that you want to give the stone a go, it is a good one. If I could find a 3-4k stone that was identical in every way but finer than this 2k then I would be in heaven. I have a few that come somewhat close but not close enough.

salemj
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by salemj » Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:09 am

Kit, I can't remember the thread, but I know you asked me if I used soft or hard balsa (actually, which one I preferred). I've only ever tried soft balsa. But I think I'd prefer hard balsa. Haha.

I've barely explored sharpening, really. I'm certainly not a compound guy, and I'm also not a "show off" guy in terms of high refinement (although I deeply respect those that can achieve this). Part of the appeal of your reviews and of stones like the 2k is that they fit with my philosophy of something that works well on all sorts of knives for all sorts of basic applications. Most of my sharpening these days is actually for friends, I'd imagine...certainly most of my more involved sharpening (as opposed to touch-up and/or finishing). I also strop a fair amount for that reason: when I do want a more refined feel to an edge, it is usually just in terms of burr removal, and not in terms of a lasting, perfect, very refined edge. I definitely see a lot of future reward in getting more into sharpening...I just need more knives to actually sharpen (meaning more friends with knives!).

Also, shipping to Canada is even worse with stones than with knives. I consider this a nice "environmental" limiting factor in my spending. Haha.
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:24 am

salemj wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:09 am
Kit, I can't remember the thread, but I know you asked me if I used soft or hard balsa (actually, which one I preferred). I've only ever tried soft balsa. But I think I'd prefer hard balsa. Haha.

I've barely explored sharpening, really. I'm certainly not a compound guy, and I'm also not a "show off" guy in terms of high refinement (although I deeply respect those that can achieve this). Part of the appeal of your reviews and of stones like the 2k is that they fit with my philosophy of something that works well on all sorts of knives for all sorts of basic applications. Most of my sharpening these days is actually for friends, I'd imagine...certainly most of my more involved sharpening (as opposed to touch-up and/or finishing). I also strop a fair amount for that reason: when I do want a more refined feel to an edge, it is usually just in terms of burr removal, and not in terms of a lasting, perfect, very refined edge. I definitely see a lot of future reward in getting more into sharpening...I just need more knives to actually sharpen (meaning more friends with knives!).

Also, shipping to Canada is even worse with stones than with knives. I consider this a nice "environmental" limiting factor in my spending. Haha.
I don't recall which thread that was either but thanks for the answer! I like the harder balsa as the soft stuff feels like it isn't doing anything. I don't see metal load up on it like it does on leather either. Almost like foam...I remember someone saying they used basswood or something like that for strops too.

I'm not a big compound guy either. I have a few, for testing purposes but I don't often go past 2-3k and plain leather or newsprint. I guess I am still doing the same thing though. I am not sure I understand some of the show off videos though. You do not need a 8k+ edge to slice tomatoes with no hands or do a drop test. It can be done off of a 1k easily enough. The edge feels different in use though. It is like pushing newsprint, people say "look how refined" and again you don't need a lot of refinement for that just a clean edge. Standing/folded newsprint with no hands can be done with a 1k-2k as well. HHT maybe not so much but I do not shave my face with a paring knife either. :lol:

That does not mean that I have not pushed edges as far as I could get the because I have and on rare occasions still do but I am, for the most part, over that. I like practicality and I find that somewhere between refined and not. However, I do have a curious side...If that were not the case I would not buy all of these stones!

But the more and more I sharpen for myself the more content I become with a Shapton 2k + Bare Roo stropped edge.

As for needing more knives to sharpen, that is why I have that tojiro. Just dull it out, chip it or whatever and repair it. When it is a nub of a knife I will break out another (I have a few). :lol: For my users, if I rotate properly, I might only have to sharpen once a year or less due to having more knives than I need. :oops:

Trust me, I understand the shipping issue having lived in Europe. Shipping from the USA or outside of the EU in general was a nightmare. Or at least it was in Spain specifically. I always got hit with a VAT tax, import, some other fees that I don't understand etc. By the time I got an object it cost more to have it imported than the item was worth itself! Which is why I tried to stick with EU to EU sales.

old onion
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by old onion » Fri Dec 22, 2017 4:38 am

I have this stone and like you,I won't ever be without it.I like how you can use different pressures on this stone and still stay in the Zen. I hate putting this stone up to dry because I just want to keep using it.

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:18 am

old onion wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 4:38 am
I have this stone and like you,I won't ever be without it.I like how you can use different pressures on this stone and still stay in the Zen. I hate putting this stone up to dry because I just want to keep using it.
Good to hear you like your stone. :)

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Altadan
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Altadan » Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:00 pm

Kit Craft wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:18 am
old onion wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 4:38 am
I have this stone and like you,I won't ever be without it.I like how you can use different pressures on this stone and still stay in the Zen. I hate putting this stone up to dry because I just want to keep using it.
Good to hear you like your stone. :)
This page is where I should have been hanging out :o

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:29 am

Altadan wrote:
Thu Apr 26, 2018 11:00 pm
Kit Craft wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 8:18 am
old onion wrote:
Fri Dec 22, 2017 4:38 am
I have this stone and like you,I won't ever be without it.I like how you can use different pressures on this stone and still stay in the Zen. I hate putting this stone up to dry because I just want to keep using it.
Good to hear you like your stone. :)
This page is where I should have been hanging out :o
Lol, keep digging. I reviewed my more used naturals and synthetics. I need to get off my butt and review everything I have. Not as much as you might think because I got rid of almost all of my soakers long ago. Dumb, should have reviewed them first.

Spipet
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Spipet » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:33 pm

Do you have any observations as to the speed with which this stone removes 1k grit scratches?

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:53 pm

Spipet wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:33 pm
Do you have any observations as to the speed with which this stone removes 1k grit scratches?
Honestly not something I test. But I can tell you that following the 1k of the same series the scratch pattern looks different viewed by the naked eye in about the same time it took to put an edge on the knife with the previous stone. Meaning I need to spend about equal amount of time on the 2k as I did on the 1k to completely replace the edge I had there to begin with, or thereabout. FWIW.

I am not much for using loops and scopes and such. I go by feel/eye.

Spipet
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Spipet » Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:55 pm

Kit Craft wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:53 pm
Spipet wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:33 pm
Do you have any observations as to the speed with which this stone removes 1k grit scratches?
Honestly not something I test. But I can tell you that following the 1k of the same series the scratch pattern looks different viewed by the naked eye in about the same time it took to put an edge on the knife with the previous stone. Meaning I need to spend about equal amount of time on the 2k as I did on the 1k to completely replace the edge I had there to begin with, or thereabout. FWIW.

I am not much for using loops and scopes and such. I go by feel/eye.
Thanks, useful! Just asking because I am looking for a good medium grit to polish bevels with. Thanks for your input!

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Kit Craft
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Kit Craft » Fri Apr 27, 2018 3:01 pm

Spipet wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:55 pm
Kit Craft wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:53 pm
Spipet wrote:
Fri Apr 27, 2018 2:33 pm
Do you have any observations as to the speed with which this stone removes 1k grit scratches?
Honestly not something I test. But I can tell you that following the 1k of the same series the scratch pattern looks different viewed by the naked eye in about the same time it took to put an edge on the knife with the previous stone. Meaning I need to spend about equal amount of time on the 2k as I did on the 1k to completely replace the edge I had there to begin with, or thereabout. FWIW.

I am not much for using loops and scopes and such. I go by feel/eye.
Thanks, useful! Just asking because I am looking for a good medium grit to polish bevels with. Thanks for your input!
No problem. I am not huge into polishing but I think the glass stones leave a more shiny finish than the pro stones on narrow bevels. At least the stones from each series that I have. The Naniwa SS might even go one further and are softer but I don't have a huge amount of experience with that series. The 5k ss polishes very, very well though. I will need to review that one too.

Pro stones do work fine though and particularly if followed by loaded strops.

Bob Z
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Re: Shapton Professional 2000

Post by Bob Z » Tue Jun 19, 2018 10:25 pm

I got one of these based on Kits review, and sold off my two coarsest stones from my CFTG sharpening kit. WOW my Wusthof gyuto, Yan can cook Cleaver, and other lower grade knives got sharper just like that! Yes this is a keeper. Usually keep a lower grit edge on my Tojiro ITK gyuto, and in moments this stone gets that knife back to some great cutting. Looking forward to Kits next recommendation of a shapton glass 500 to go with it.

What about the better stuff? havent tried any of those yet since I dont sharpen that often but will ck in when i do.

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