Kurosaki Fujin

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Altadan
Posts: 1312
Joined: Wed Aug 09, 2017 9:15 pm
Location: Dallas, TX

Re: Kurosaki Fujin

Post by Altadan » Wed Oct 02, 2019 10:22 am

Sounds pretty sweet to me ;)

Over these past couple months I've had the pleasure of an inordinate number of "loan" knives from some very generous forum members.
Among them were also a Tanaka 210 and 240 R2, as well as my own recently purchased Kono MM G3. Suffice it to say that my 2-year relationship with my own sekiso, and my enamor with carbon, patina, colors, and so forth, has now given more room for a "re-discovery" of the convenience of stainless :)
Still, when it comes to sharpening or (especially) touching up, carbon is just as smooth as can be.

I love having both a curvy Tanaka and a flattish MM. They complement (not compliment!) one another very well.

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jbart65
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Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2017 9:18 pm

Re: Kurosaki Fujin

Post by jbart65 » Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:32 pm

I kind of think of my stainless clad carbon knives as basically stainless, but yeah, sometimes I just dont want to fuss. Hence my love of ginsan.

That said, my Sekiso troubles me not. Rarely is its reactivity an issue. One thing I do is give a 1-second rinse at my prep sink 2 feet from my cutting board when I cut acidic ingredients. The quick rinse sort of resets the knife and I don't have to wipe.

Nice to have a golf cart full of knives, though. Flat ones, push cutters, ones with belly. Carbon, stainless, clad. Light, medium, heavy. Laser, convex. 210s, 240s, nakiris, santokus, bunkas.
Jeffry B

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jbart65
Posts: 2956
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2017 9:18 pm

Re: Kurosaki Fujin

Post by jbart65 » Thu Oct 10, 2019 1:47 pm

After using the Tanaka VG10 for a few weeks, I am even more impressed. It sharpens easily, holds a pretty good edge and the thin tip is terrific at detailed work.

It’s as sharp as any 240 gyuto I’ve used that was stainless. Only the Kamo R2 might, might have been a hair sharper.

For comparison’s sake, I sharpened my new Kurosaki Fujin 210 using the same stone sequence as the Tanaka.

The new edge on the Fujin was definitely sharper than the out-of-the-box edge. It seemed just as sharp as the Tanaka, too.

Yet I seemed to face a touch more resistance on a few ingredients, though it might have been the Fujin finish or the fact that it’s just a 210. In my experience the weight and length of 240s often seem to convey the impression that they cut sharper than a 210 even though it’s not actually the case.

The Damascus finish on the Tanaka, on the other hand, is causing less stickage than when it was brand new.

What don’t I like?

Well, the profile is rounded and has some back curve that can lead to accordion cuts when chopping on delicate ingredients such as scallions. The VG10 chops decently, but not quite as well as my Tanaka Sekiso or Tanaka Nashiji.

I’d give the Tanaka Nashiji the slightest of edges on peak sharpness relative to the VG10 and Sekiso, but that’s splitting hairs. On a 0-100 scale, I’d put the Nashiji at 96 and the other two at 94 or 95.

The tips on the Sekiso and VG10, on the other hand, might be a touch better. The Sekiso has the thickest tip of the three, but damn does it cut real fine. Just as well as the VG10 - the thinnest and most laser like of the trio.

Still trying to decide whether to keep the VG10 as my lone stainless 240 or stick with My Kanehiro ginsan. The VG10 is sharper, but I do like the overall profile of the Kanehiro somewhat better, not to mention the nicer handle.
Jeffry B

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