Knife for Butchering Salmon

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ChefKnivesToGo
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Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by ChefKnivesToGo » Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:45 pm

Hello Susan and Mark!

My husband and I have bought multiple knives and products over the past 5-ish years from y’all. (Both of us are in the industry) We really appreciate your customer service!!

I started a new job (sushi/poke restaurant) recently where I am butchering whole salmons and 1/4 skin on ahi tuna loins. My chef has 2 knives that I’ve used somewhat when prepping fish at work, a 9” or 10” a shun Dual Core blue Kiritsuke (8oz weight, I’m aware this is a discontinued knife) and a shun classic gokujo boning fillet knife. I like the feel of both but I was wondering if you had anything similar in stock or what brands I should check out in the CKTG store that have a similar feel/weight/will sharpen up well. I’m looking to spend maybe in the 300$ range. I’m planning on buying something in the coming weeks but am trying to do research now. Would like to buy a kiritsuke or something of the like first. (I have a tojiro stainless slicer /carbon Nakiri that I do quite enjoy!)

I have the Shapton glass stone set from the CKTG store as well, any knife/sharpening recommendations would be welcomed as well. I have watched your videos on YouTube to help my sharpening game. I feel like I need an edge guide? And probably a better plate to flatten the stones too.


I know y’all are busy, I do appreciate your time very much!!

A happy customer with too many questions

Sarah
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Re: Butchering Salmon

Post by ChefKnivesToGo » Sat Sep 07, 2019 12:46 pm

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 7, 2019, at 12:11 PM, Chefknivestogo <[email protected]> wrote:

Hi Sarah,

Here is our standard recommendation request form. Even though you answered some of these please fill it out and I'll match a couple knives to your criteria.
Let's focus on the large kiritsuke or similar for processing salmon and tuna first.

1)Pro or home cook? (Professional)
2)What kind of knife do you want? (Kiritsuke or something to fillet large fish)
3) What size knife do you want? (240 mm-270 mm)

4)How much do you want to spend? ($300ish)
5) Do you prefer stainless or reactive carbon? (Either, if there is a stainless clad I’m down with that. Whatever will sharpen up nicely on the shapton glass I have)
6)Do you prefer Western or Japanese handle? (Mostly Japanese, I own both though and like both, I have small hands)
7)What are your main knife/knives now? image1.jpeg
1 sekimagoroku ss 180 mm 60$ kind of a beater.

2 tojiro shirogami itk 165 mm
I really like how sharp this gets I think blade is bent though.. vegetables/chives/brunoise

3 misono ux10 ss honesuki 145 mm deboning chix/skinning pork belly hard to keep the single bevel/ 90/10ish for me

4 my husbands knife always loved the weight/feel has a thick spine so maybe a deba? 165mm Dunno if you recognize this brand.
A JOY to sharpen

5 tojiro dp sujihiki 240 mm slicing/breaking down salmon/tuna I feel like I shouldn’t use for tuna since it’s a slicer...

6 hatsuyuki? gyuto 245 mm I bought from you in 2013-14 first Japanese knife I can’t find any info on it (had to resort to reddit to read kanji) general use onions etc feel like I can’t get a good edge on this :(

7 doghouse forge nakiri 180 mm (based in Lakeland,FL) I use this knife all the time. Vegetables/brunoise etc. Out of the box sharp as hell easy to touch up

8 shun petty vg max Damascus 150 mm just recently put a good edge on this found hard to sharpen

9 konosuke hd2 petty 134 mm bought it off a friend after tip broke and was fixed this is much shorter now than it should be.


8)Do you prefer something rustic or production-oriented with good fit and finish? (Either, I wanna get a rust eraser)
9)Are you a rocker, chopper or push cutter? (Rocker, push cutter depends on what I’m doing)
10)Do you know how to sharpen? (Yes) trying to get better



Thank you!!!!
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Mark Richmond
Co-Owner Chefknivestogo
https://www.chefknivestogo.com

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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by ChefKnivesToGo » Sun Sep 08, 2019 12:48 pm

Hi Sarah,

Ok usually Japanese cooks will use 2 single bevel knives, a deba and a yanagi. The deba handles the early work of butchering a fist like fin and tail and head removal and separating filets. The yanagi is pulled out once you're doing the portioning.

So here are 2 knives that would work well for you:

https://www.chefknivestogo.com/risade180mm.html
https://www.chefknivestogo.com/risawh2ya27.html
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lsboogy
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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by lsboogy » Sun Sep 08, 2019 1:22 pm

I do lots of salmon (whole fish to portions) at my second job. I find a good gyuto works very well on them. My favorite knife for salmon is still my Richmond Ultimatum or a CHII blade. Slit the head and break it off, filet, tweezers for the pin bones, skin and clean grey stuff out, tail white thing out, portion.

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Altadan
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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by Altadan » Tue Sep 10, 2019 11:53 pm

Regarding your improving sharpening skills,
Many will agree that sure way to ldo it, islearn from a pro like Peter Nowlan.
His course can be a little wordy, but the things he repeats are the things we all need to hear more than once ;) it's an excellent resource that can cut a whole lotta guessing outta your progress.
Check it out
https://www.knifeplanet.net/knife-sharp ... ne-course/

Qapla'
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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by Qapla' » Wed Sep 11, 2019 3:46 am

There does exist a specialized knife for butchering salmon; a sakekiri.

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Drewski
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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by Drewski » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:23 am

Qapla' wrote:
Wed Sep 11, 2019 3:46 am
There does exist a specialized knife for butchering salmon; a sakekiri.
Found a 300 mm sakekiri that weighs 20 oz. What a beast.

salemj
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Re: Knife for Butchering Salmon

Post by salemj » Wed Sep 11, 2019 9:35 am

Sarah, how roomy is your workspace?

I'm not a professional, but to me, this is the #1 criterion.

Most poke places are small and quick-service, so I'd guess that is your place and that it is mostly "tight" in the back.

If it is more all-in-one and you have limited space but need speed and efficiency, you might consider a mioroshi deba. I've never used one, but I've always thought that one in 210mm would be super-versatile for switching quickly between "butchering," "cleaning," and slicing. I've seen people use these in videos and the efficiency is incredible, especially on things like poultry and (I assume) fish when the task includes dealing with bones and skin back to back. It is like using a good gyuto, except the shorter heel heights and chisel grind really seem to make a difference in a multitude of ways, much like people who use single-bevel honesuki start to swear by them for butchering. It is harder to get a stainless one, but just imagine using one of these:

https://www.chefknivestogo.com/saw2mide21.html
https://www.chefknivestogo.com/kibl2mide21.html

I think this style of blade may also resonate a little bit with the starting place of your OP (8oz shuns).

I also think that a deba and a smaller sujihiki might do very well for this work in a tighter space. In tighter spaces, a 240mm suji should be long enough AND short enough, and having minimal heel height will considerably add to its maneuverability in tight spaces and on horizontal cuts, etc., with minimal elbow room and depth at the station. (The fact that you have small hands is a bonus here.). Similarly, a deba will give you a lot of butchering power even at a shorter length, such as a 165 or 180. I think the combination of those two knives would work better than one larger gyuto or even a larger (270+) yanagiba in your situation, not least because the tighter the space, the harder it can be to use a single-bevel knife that sometimes requires a lot of flipping or turning to get the right chisel angle on the single bevel.

In either case, I'd consider checking out Takayuki. I bet their stainless (inox) line of debas is great and low-maintenance, and I also think I've seen a morioshi from them in this design before...

The bonus of knives like the morioshi deba over a yanagiba is that the former is designed for all aspects of butchering AND is easy to "align" with the product because it is taller so finding the right chisel angle while working sideways and under the skin is probably easier. I think yanagis are really best suited for the most skilled workers who are focused just on cleaning and slicing and less on butchering, but I could be wrong.
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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