What is Good Cutting Technique?

Proper user technique and care is essential to enjoying these high performance knives to their fullest while keeping edge damage to a minimum. Learn how here.
User avatar
desol
Posts: 1831
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 5:01 pm

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by desol »

I always though this fellow had very good control.

appleward91
Posts: 289
Joined: Sun Oct 01, 2017 12:32 pm

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by appleward91 »

wow, i couldn't have asked for a better write up. Had these questions myself

CraigC
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2019 12:53 pm

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by CraigC »

After reading this, I noticed that I have a bad habit of twisting the blade slightly after I have reached the cutting board. I have some adjustments to make in my cutting habits!
Stay sharp.

Paul282
Posts: 56
Joined: Fri Dec 14, 2018 5:25 pm
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by Paul282 »

Does anyone have advice for technique with your off/claw hand? Keep your finger tips curled and out of harm's way of course but what about the finer details?

Initially, I thought why in God's name would someone want to put their non cutting hand so close to the blade? Over time, I've found the separation of my hands to be the scarier situation. I'm more comfortable with my knuckles against the knife so I know where everything is. However... I do sometimes feel concerned I am going to smoothly slice my skin from the bone by raising the knife slightly above my knuckles by accident.

Should I be guiding the knife with my first or second knuckle? Is there a guideline for "when" you move your offhand? Anything else I'm missing? Up until recently I was moving my off hand early in the cutting stroke so I had to bring the knife back up after cutting and also move the knife horizontally to return contact with my off hand. Lately I've been waiting to move my offhand until the knife is back in it's starting position. Essentially the off hand never losing contact with the blade/always moving them very much together.

I'm a home cook so I dont get nearly the amount of reps in as someone in the food industry but I am trying to improve. I employ all cuts described in this great thread. I'd probably describe my knife skills as fair compared to the level of this forum audience. I focus on technique but also try to push my cutting speed maybe a little too close to the edge of reckless in an attempt to improve every time I cook. Any thoughts are appreciated.

User avatar
lsboogy
Posts: 1341
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2018 1:23 pm
Location: Minneapolis
Has thanked: 8 times
Been thanked: 34 times

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by lsboogy »

I think which knuckle I use depends on the product. For taller ingredients I find myself using just my middle finger knuckle and using the other fingers to move the hand over the product (kind of like a spider crossing stuff- use finger tips to control where things are) but cutting shorter stuff (green onions etc) I use my index finger knuckle and use my fingernails to hold stuff down. Just personal preference, but I learned that stuff 50 years ago from my mom and watching Julia Child.

timc247
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2017 3:39 pm

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by timc247 »

honestly good cutting technique to me has more to do with the shape and consistency of your cut. I've seen guys with expensive knives shell out terrible looking cuts while my mexican prep cook uses only an offset bread knife and everything looks flawless

Energizerbunny
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:31 pm
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by Energizerbunny »

Dufus53 wrote:
Tue Feb 07, 2017 7:18 pm
Great post! I grew up with PBS cooking shows, well before the cooking channel or youtube...yes I'm old. My technique was derived from Martin Yan and Jacques Pepin...abuse of both blade and board. Didn't think of revising my approach until chipping my new Takeda going all Pepin on some herbs. Wondering how to finally mince garlic and herbs without reaching for the Wusthof battle axe?
I was just watching some old Justin Wilson videos on youtube.

Energizerbunny
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Mar 11, 2017 12:31 pm
Has thanked: 3 times
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by Energizerbunny »

loco_food_guy wrote:
Fri Apr 07, 2017 10:59 pm
Its interesting to me the different ways that people will approach the same thing. Take for instance dicing an onion. As a chef/cook. I never, not once, took into consideration the contact that my knife was making with the cutting board (the only exception would be if someone was working near the dining room and noise was a concern). The objective was ALWAYS to cut the onion as perfectly as it needed to be cut and as quickly and efficiently as possible. Care for the knife came in the form of flipping it from the blade side to the spine side to drag food from the cutting board into what ever vessel was to hold the finished prep item so as to not cause unneeded wear on the blade. This was ALWAYS the approach and it is to this day. The integrity of the product being prepped and the efficiency of the task was/is most important. I'm not saying that we didn't or don't care for our knives but just not thought about like that. That goes for all things cut. There are many ways to cut the same thing and get the same result and at that point it becomes subjective. I know chefs who are very comfortable cutting all sorts of items on the pull side of a cut. They can slice vegies, herbs etc on the pull cut. I personally prefer to push cut. Its always felt more controlled and natural to me but it also depend on what I am cutting. The approach will vary. With that said, if your are chipping your knife cutting herbs, you might want to use a less heavy handed approach.
For me it depends on what I'm cutting. Softer ingredients like getting pulled

For instance cucumber. If you are slicing whole disks and using a push they will go all over the place. Pulling them will result in a much more controlled experience. Often times but not always they will fall in a neat pile.
Tomatoes also like being pulled ime.

jacko9
Posts: 2040
Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2017 12:51 pm
Location: SF Bay Area, Ca
Has thanked: 65 times
Been thanked: 18 times

Re: What is Good Cutting Technique?

Post by jacko9 »

I refuse to pay photo bucket a monthly fee so I can't open your video. Good description of cutting techniques however.

Post Reply