Going where you guide them

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lsboogy
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Going where you guide them

Post by lsboogy » Sun Apr 14, 2019 5:10 pm

I'm starting to notice that some knives go where you point them, and some wander a bit. My line knife (Richmond GT AUS-8) will move just a little making cuts I semi hard (zucchini etc) veg - I learned with old Sabatier knives (heavy, but they went where you pointed them) and have discovered differences in guiding knives lately - some go where you point them, some seem to follow the product - are there reasons pro chefs like certain knives for this reason? I have seen very little on this up here, but am finding certain knives I use to really go where they are pointed. Not a sharpness thing, not a profile thing, but seems to be a combination of grind and sharpening. I'm kind of learning to survive in a pro kitchen, but am interested in what real chefs think on this. I'm terribly proud of my lady couple weeks of slicing zucchini - no thin slices, no wedges, no thick slices - and the whole pan turns transparent at the same time. My carrots are having the same thing - is there a steerability quotient or something like that applied to knives?

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ken123
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Re: Going where you guide them

Post by ken123 » Sun Apr 14, 2019 7:40 pm

My first suspicions are regarding edge flatness and asymmetry - pretty much what you see in yanagis andesoecially usubas. You wont notice it much on green onions but will notice it cutting melons. The more asymmetric, the less likely it will cut where you intend. Play with edge angles - even microbevels.

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Ken

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lsboogy
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Re: Going where you guide them

Post by lsboogy » Sun Apr 14, 2019 10:07 pm

Ken,
I think this is different than you are thinking. More in terms of how a knife steers through things - my line knife is a 50/50 thing but the blade is not as stiff as a Carter - it moves left and right with different densities of product. I've never really noticed it before, but is acutely in my mind at present. I played around with a couple Kikuichi blades, my line knife, tonight and my Carter and the pass around job - all blades went through stuff but the 52100 Carter had the best uniformity of slices. I think I am starting to get the last performance bits of knives - the Kikuichi stuff is good (little wander with very uniform mushroom and zucchini), my line knife has great performance but the slices of zucchini are wandering both left and right with several having an s shape in profile (following something in the product), and the 52100'blade just dropping straight through everything. This is a thing where the slices are placed in glass and observed - I needed a break from taxes. The Kikuichi blades followed density in product, as did my line knife. They turn out stuff with 0.2 to 0.3mm variance in slice, the Carter blades were both less than 0.1mm variance. Maybe it's my prejudice or technique, but the Carter blades give very uniform slices - not a sharpening thing. Something in how they steer though product - no idea if its something I'm doing or the maker - but my slices vary with blades

jmcnelly85
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Re: Going where you guide them

Post by jmcnelly85 » Mon Apr 15, 2019 12:32 pm

I think I know what you are alluding to. Some knives will wedge true while others steer and veer; however, the effect is magnified by technique. I’ve long had a bad habit of holding a knife slightly off perfectly perpendicular, some slightly asymmetric knives naturally would work when my technique got sloppy while others were downright impossible unless I were constantly thinking about lining up the asymmetry. Knowing and finding a knives strengths and weaknesses and how they relate to the user illuminates how hard it is to find a one and done. Know your roll.

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