Thinning

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Lionel Joyce
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Thinning

Post by Lionel Joyce » Mon Sep 16, 2019 6:58 pm

Have a Kohetsu SLD 130mm petty which I really like, but it is very wedgy: 3mm spine for a good portion of its length. I find it heavy going on harder veggies and fruit.
What is the best way to thin it down? I have waterstones from 220 grit upwards - but that sounds like seriously slow work. I also have access to a belt sander
Thanks

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lsboogy
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Re: Thinning

Post by lsboogy » Mon Sep 16, 2019 7:42 pm

Id start with water stones and go slow if you are going to do it yourself. I send mine to Chris (cjmeik) on the forum. He does a spectacular job.

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ken123
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Re: Thinning

Post by ken123 » Tue Sep 17, 2019 4:51 am

Think in terms of thinning the whole blade rather than just the edge. I use slowly rotating belts as you do want a convex grind. Stones have a way of producing a spotty grind.



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Ken

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ken123
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Re: Thinning

Post by ken123 » Tue Sep 17, 2019 4:57 am



Thinnng a Takeda. Watch the FULL video
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Ken

Lionel Joyce
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Re: Thinning

Post by Lionel Joyce » Tue Sep 17, 2019 1:48 pm

Thanks for the answers so far. I'm getting the impression that conventional thinning is more about tapering the blade from the existing spine to the edge. A 3mm spine would stay a 3mm spine. What I was hoping to do was to take the spine down to 2mm. I am starting to believe that thinning to that extent is not such a good idea

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ken123
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Re: Thinning

Post by ken123 » Fri Sep 20, 2019 3:16 pm

Actually you can taper the entire blade which would include the spine. Much more labor is involved. If your cuts are splitting because of the thickness at the spine, this would be advised - so going to 2 mm might be an answer. You should be interactive - get some food to cut to help you make decisions here.

The lesser approach would just involve thinning the edge.

If you are using a smaller belt grinder - typical 1x30 inches, if it goes fast, you run the risk of burning your blade - especially the tip. Be careful doing this. Slower belts are a much better choice. Some 1x42 units run much better because they are slow. Select a unit that has no restrictions around the belt like you will see in Home Depot type units.

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Ken

Lionel Joyce
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Re: Thinning

Post by Lionel Joyce » Sat Sep 21, 2019 1:00 pm

Thanks, Ken. Helpful advice

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ken123
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Re: Thinning

Post by ken123 » Fri Sep 27, 2019 5:01 pm

You're most welcome.

If you decide to do this yourself and run into trouble, just contact me anytime. If you decide to send it out ... well I do that too.

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Ken

stevem627
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Re: Thinning

Post by stevem627 » Tue Oct 01, 2019 12:53 pm

I have this exact petty. I think if you want a cleaner cut, you could thin the knife. For me, though, the cladding looks great and to take off enough to do what you want you would have to remove a lot of the visual appeal. I have a Tojiro 120mm petty for cleaner cuts. If you want another petty in this category, there are plenty with thinner blades here that would be good replacements.

Lionel Joyce
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Re: Thinning

Post by Lionel Joyce » Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:11 pm

Stevem: Thanks. I believe I have reached the same conclusion

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